Advice for dating a jewish man

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23, 2009, on the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire. *** Soon after my bar mitzvah, just as I was discovering my interest in the opposite sex, I began to be bombarded with information about intermarriage—about how one in every two Jewish people would marry a non-Jew and how more than half of the children of those unions would not be raised Jewish.

But as I fell in love with her, she fell in love with me—and with my Judaism as well.

), or maybe you just think you would be more successful in dating and marriage if you joined the tribe (or a member of the tribe). In this series of pages we’re making it our mission to set you straight (no pun intended) regarding everything you want to know about this subject. For thousands of years, probably close to 4,000, since the patriarch Abraham began his grand nation building project, the Jewish People have stuck to their own when it comes to marriage.

Whatever the reason we’ve decided to try and clarify things for you a bit. Sure things were a little fluid the days of the Patriarchs, but once Jacob and his 12 sons went down to Egypt for a few hundred years of bondage, and certainly after the Exodus, marrying exclusively Jewish was a requirement set in stone (literally).

I felt the pressure: The future of my people was at stake! The school was arty, musical, nerdy, and had a substantial Jewish population. Even though I no longer felt outside the norm, I still had trouble getting dates … Every Jewish woman I asked out on a date rejected me.

For me the atheism would probably be a deal breaker, but maybe you’re compatible in that way.

If we couldn’t treat each other as equals and each make sacrifices accordingly then it wouldn’t work. Is there anyone Jewish around you’d love just as much? How much time do you have to find someone else you love and want to have a family with?

How will you feel if he cuts it off and marries someone else while you’re dithering?

There are a lot of stereotypes and myths related to Jewish dating. Nothing much has changed in that department over the last 4,000 years.

The rules of traditional Jewish that define who is a Jew are still the same. If you want to guess, it probably relates to the fact that you can more easily and definitively prove the connection between a child and its mother than between a child and its father. So you need to be born of a Jewish mother to be considered Jewish.

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